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Office of Assessment for Curricular Effectiveness Division of Academic Engagement and Student Achievement

New Unit Name, Mission Statement, and Website: ATL is now the Office of Assessment for Curricular Effectiveness (ACE)

As the academic year unfolds, our office will be working under a new name, as the Office of Assessment for Curricular Effectiveness (ACE), formerly the Office of Assessment of Teaching and Learning (ATL).

“Our unit’s new name recognizes that program-level assessment at WSU has matured over the past ten years,” explains ACE Director Kimberly Green. “ACE highlights the role of program-level assessment of student learning in supporting quality undergraduate curricula.” » More …

WSU EPPM Updated to Recognize Value of Program Assessment

Faculty Senate recently approved an update to university-wide assessment policy, making more explicit the value of genuine assessment of student learning, as a way to identify areas of weakness, as well as strengths, and help guide program improvement. The statement, added to the Educational Policies and Procedures Manual (EPPM, Section 11.4), also specifies that assessment results will not be used punitively against individuals or programs, or used alone for high stakes decisions. » More …

Sample Reflective Questions for Undergraduate Degree Program Assessment for Spring 2020

The unexpected COVID-19 outbreak, and resulting move to remote learning, means a disrupted and stressful semester with substantial challenges and changes to courses, teaching, and learning. As outlined in ATL’s Guidance and Priorities for Undergraduate Program Assessment for Spring 2020, programs may want to consider conducting alternative formative assessment activities, to help gauge the impacts of this semester on teaching, learning, and curricula. This input may be useful in informing decisions about potential adjustments to courses taught in upcoming semesters.

ATL has prepared sample reflective questions (downloadable Word document) intended to help undergraduate degree programs intentionally gather input about adjustments made this semester and potential impacts on student learning throughout the curriculum. This resource is intended to provide a flexible approach to collecting valuable input from program faculty and/or students to be used as qualitative program assessment data this semester. ATL encourages programs to adapt and implement these reflective questions as best fits their context and capacity.

We appreciate all that faculty, advisors, and staff are doing to deliver courses and support students, and are glad to discuss these reflective questions to help determine what will serve each program. Please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Celebrating Excellence in WSU Undergraduate Program Assessment

Interim Provost Bryan Slinker speaking at 2019 Celebration of Assessment Excellence.On November 6th, the Office of Assessment of Teaching and Learning (ATL), Interim Provost Bryan Slinker, and Vice Provost Mary F. Wack hosted the second Celebration of Assessment Excellence, shining a spotlight on good practices in learning outcomes assessment and the efforts of program faculty, faculty assessment coordinators, chairs and directors, representing diverse academic programs and colleges, who share a strong commitment to providing high quality education to WSU’s undergraduate population. » More …

ATL Visit to WSU Tri-Cities and Assignment Design Workshop

ATL would like to thank WSU Tri-Cities faculty and staff for a successful visit this fall. In November, ATL traveled to WSU’s Tri-Cities Campus to meet with WSU Tri-Cities colleagues about program assessment and to present a workshop on Transparent Assignment Design» More …

Team-based Online Focus Group Activity Collects Student Input on Capstone Project (Agricultural and Food Systems)

Focus groups provide a way to get feedback about student experiences, perceptions, and motivations, and can provide insight into the ways a curriculum can be most effectively designed to support student learning.

In Spring 2017, ATL worked with Dr. Desmond Layne, Director of Agricultural and Food Systems (AFS), to pilot a new focus group activity designed to elicit feedback on capstone students’ project team interactions with their industry partners. While traditional focus groups typically involve a facilitated whole group discussion, ATL’s pilot activity used a live online discussion board where teams leveraged their experience in group decision-making to respond to questions.  » More …

Using the Paired Question Technique to Assess Student Learning in General Chemistry (Chemistry)

Assessment data serve multiple functions in the assessment process. These data provide insight into student performance in order to offer evidence about student learning in the curriculum, provide information about program strengths and weaknesses, and guide decision-making. A robust data set provides a rich base for analysis, faculty discussion, and evidence-based decision making. In this way, assessment results inform continual reflection and discussion to ensure effective teaching and learning.  » More …

Inaugural Celebration of Assessment Excellence at WSU

Provost Dan Bernardo.The Office of Assessment of Teaching and Learning (ATL), along with Provost Daniel J. Bernardo and Vice Provosts Erica W. Austin and Mary F. Wack, are delighted to recognize undergraduate programs, departments and schools where program-level assessment is well-established, thanks in large part to the efforts of faculty assessment coordinators, chairs and directors. In November 2017, ATL and the WSU Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education hosted a Celebration of Assessment Excellence, honoring sixteen undergraduate programs on the Pullman Campus with exemplary assessment practices.  » More …

Communicating Assessment Results with Faculty (Psychology)

In successful assessment cycles, degree programs collect and interpret evidence to inform decision-making to improve student learning. Faculty and instructors play critical roles in evaluating student work and then interpreting and discussing results, so that program-level assessment can contribute to decisions about curriculum, instruction, professional development, and assessment processes.  » More …

Using a Rubric to Assess Student Learning at the Senior-Level (Sociology)

An effective system of assessing student achievement includes measures at the senior level, near graduation, providing information about what students are able to achieve at the end of the program. For many programs, senior-level direct measures connect with a capstone course, as these culminating experiences can provide valuable holistic information about students’ learning before they graduate.  » More …